Centre_Court_Wimbledon_2

Formerly known as Lawn Tennis, modern-day Tennis originated from England and France, in the late 1800s.  Tennis is a universal sport followed and played by people around the world either professionally or as a recreational activity.  It is a game that can be played by anyone regardless of gender, age, or societal status, and I consider it along with Soccer to be one of the universal sports in the world.

Tennis appeals to a lot of people for different reasons.  There is the pure love of competition of which the game never lacks.  For others such as myself, there is that sense of individualism versus team based sports that plays a role in the attraction to tennis.  This individualism is what makes tennis such a great parallel to everyday life.  Stripped down to its barest essence, it embodies the effort made by an individual to get somewhere – progress to the next round as it were – and the obstacles that stand in the way.  Sometimes that obstacle is our very selves and at other times, we indeed do have a nemesis which repeatedly prevents us from attaining what we want.

There is a human element to the game.  You see these players go through periods of triumphs and periods of defeat.  You see them will themselves to be better than the rest by maximizing their strengths and mitigating their weaknesses.  We connect with them on a personal level and see glimpses of what we consider their flaws.  It is this connection that leads us to gravitate to some or distance ourselves from others.  However, there is always a connection even if it is identifying with something we don’t like.  For at the end of the day, these players are human like we are, and when they are out there on the court, there is nowhere to run.  There is nowhere to hide and no ‘teammate’ to divert the attention.

Despite all this, in the confines of those on court dimensions where the game is played, magic and miracles can happen.  Every so often, they indeed do.

2 thoughts on “About

  1. “…modern-day Tennis originated from England and France, in the late 1900s. ”

    Surely you mean “…the late 1800’s” !

    1. You are in fact right that I do!
      Thank you for catching that. I am a bit flummoxed as to how I missed that but I am indebted to you. I will correct it right away.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s